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What happens if child support becomes too much?

| Aug 25, 2020 | Child Custody |

You can still have your family’s best interest in mind, even after the divorce process. A big part of going your separate ways is determining your share of support for the children, but it could be tough to move the needle once the courts set a price.

A Nebraska divorce could cost you around $10,000, but that price could increase over $5,000 when you add children into the mix. Determining custody and support comes at a price, but getting the process wrong could cost you even more.

Shifting support

You could modify child support after the fact, but it isn’t guaranteed that you’ll get the changes you’re after. Big changes could warrant a new number, but you may have to wait before you can ask the court to look at your case. You’ll also need to supply a lot of information to show you meet the requirements for a difference in payment.

Subsiding standards

You may have to meet some strict requirements to prove that it’s time for a change:

  • Compensation: You may get a modification if your pay has dropped by more than 10%. The courts could also ask to see proof that the dip didn’t happen because of your actions, like quitting your job voluntarily.
  • Costs: The price of raising a child can be daunting, but substantial savings can affect what you owe. Decreases in childcare and educational costs alike can warrant modifications.
  • Care: Health insurance is a major cost for many families, and footing the bill for the kids can be a big ask. Losing health care through your job or reductions in ongoing care could all trigger changes in your monthly support.

Determining the best course of action for initial support hearings could be essential to conserving your quality of life. You may want to contribute your part to raise the children, but too much could cost you dearly. With the high bar for making a change down the line, it could be crucial to get it right the first time.